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  • #439

    admin
    Keymaster
    Quote:
    An Apple Television Appears Extremely Unlikely in the Near-term

    Relative to the television market, Eddy Cue, Apple SVP of Internet Software and Services, reiterated the company’s mantra that it will enter markets where it feels it can create great customer experiences and address key problems. The key problems in the television market are the poor quality of the user interface and the forced bundling of pay TV content, in our view. While Apple could almost certainly create a better user interface, Mr. Cue’s commentary suggested that this would be an incomplete solution from Apple’s perspective unless it could deliver content in a way that is different from the current multichannel pay TV model.

    Unfortunately for Apple and for consumers, acquiring rights for traditional broadcast and cable network content outside of the current bundled model is virtually impossible because the content is owned by a relatively small group of companies that have little interest in alternative models for their most valuable content. The differences in regional broadcast content and the lack of scale internationally also create significant hurdles that do not seem possible to cross at this point.

    After meeting with Apple execs, analyst expects no television solution any time soon – Apple 2.0 – Fortune Tech

    #1787

    admin
    Keymaster
    Quote:
    The key problems in the television market are … the forced bundling of pay TV content

    The end is near for traditional Pay TV.

    It doesn’t m[ATTACH]83.vB[/ATTACH]atter what the traditional multi-channel providers (pay TV) do to protect their turf. Eventually, the package concept where you have to pay for 150 channels that you don’t want just to get the 5 channels you do want will fail.

    Gradually, customers will move away from traditionally distributed pay TV providers towards other sources. As income from traditional sources drops, content creators will seek out whatever method of distribution provides them income. The longer Pay TV providers bury their heads in the sand, the worse their odds of survival become.

    In the end, people who want a sports channel will bear the REAL cost of ESPN, instead of forcing every subscriber to subsidize, pay for, and get ESPN as part of their package, even if they don’t want it. And all those crappy little subsidized networks that have very few viewers will either have to find a new revenue model, or fold – As it should be.

    #1788

    admin
    Keymaster
    Roku Guru, post: 1351 wrote:
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]83[/ATTACH]The end is near for traditional Pay TV.

    It doesn’t matter what the traditional multi-channel providers (pay TV) do to protect their turf. Eventually, the package concept where you have to pay for 150 channels that you don’t want just to get the 5 channels you do want will fail.

    Gradually, customers will move away from traditionally distributed pay TV providers towards other sources. As income from traditional sources drops, content creators will seek out whatever method of distribution provides them income. The longer Pay TV providers bury their heads in the sand, the worse their odds of survival become.

    In the end, people who want a sports channel will bear the REAL cost of ESPN, instead of forcing every subscriber to subsidize, pay for, and get ESPN as part of their package, even if they don’t want it. And all those crappy little subsidized networks that have very few viewers will either have to find a new revenue model, or fold – As it should be.

    Writing this post inspired an expanded post on my blog.
    For those that are interested, it’s here:
    [h=3]The End Is Near For Traditional Pay TV[/h]

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